Collection

Arshile Gorky
American, 1904-1948

The Horns of the Landscape, 1944
Oil on canvas
Gift from the collection of Katherine Sanford Deutsch, class of 1940
2000.6
Period: 20th c
Classification: Painting
Dimensions: Framed: 31 3/4 x 35 3/4 x 2 1/4 in. (80.65 x 90.81 x 5.72 cm) Unframed: 30 x 34 in. (76.2 x 86.36 cm)
Signatures, Inscriptions and Markings v
Signed and dated
Provenance v
The Estate of Arshile Gorky
Exhibition History v
Japan, Shimane Art Museum, "Paris--New York; Modern Paintings in 19th and 20th Century Master Works from the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, New York," March 7 - May 11, 2008. Cat. no. 50, p 109. Japan, Ishibashi Museum of Art, "Paris--New York; Modern Paintings in 19th and 20th Century Master Works from the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, New York," May 17 - July 20, 2008. Cat. no. , p . Japan, Yamagata Museum of Art, "Paris--New York; Modern Paintings in 19th and 20th Century Master Works from the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, New York," July 30 - August 31, 2008. Cat. no. , p. . Japan. Fuchu Art Museum, "Paris--New York; Modern Paintings in 19th and 20th Century Master Works from the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, New York," September 6 - November 3, 2008. Cat. no. , p. . Japan, Miyazaki Prefectural Art Museum, "Paris--New York; Modern Paintings in 19th and 20th Century Master Works from the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, New York," November 14 - December 14, 2008. Cat. , p. . Greenwich, Conn., Bruce Museum, "The American Avant-Garde: A Decade of Change, 1936-1946," September 11, 2000-January 10, 2001.
Description v
In 1920, Vasdanig Manoog Adoian arrived in the United States from his native Armenia. After making his living teaching art in Watertown, Massa- chusetts, and Providence, Rhode Island, he moved to New York in 1925 and changed his name to Arshile Gorky, as an homage to the Russian author. His early work was largely influenced by Picasso and, in the 1930s, he received several important public arts commissions. In the 1940s his work grew increasingly influenced by the European Surrealists such as Miró and Matta, and during this time his paintings became more animated and turbulent. The Horns of the Landscape represents a very mature example of this Surrealist work. It is somewhat unusual within the context of Gorky’s total output by virtue of the areas where the colors seems to bleed and run down the canvas, suggesting that the work is delicate and virtually dematerializing before your eyes. Gorky experimented with this technique with only a few paintings during the years 1944/45, one key example of which is presently in the collection of the Albright Knox Museum in Buffalo.
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